Introduction to Feng Shui

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese system of aesthetics believed to use the laws of both Heaven (astronomy) and Earth (geography) to help one improve life by receiving positive Qi (Ch'i). The term feng shui literally translates as “wind-water” in English. Historically, feng shui was widely used to orient buildings – often spiritually significant structures…

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese system of aesthetics believed to use the laws of both Heaven (astronomy) and Earth (geography) to help one improve life by receiving positive Qi (Ch'i).

The term feng shui literally translates as “wind-water” in English.

Historically, feng shui was widely used to orient buildings – often spiritually significant structures such as tombs, but also dwellings and other structures – in an auspicious manner. Depending on the particular style of feng shui being used, an auspicious site could have been determined by reference to local features such as bodies of water, stars, or a compass. Feng shui has seen an increase in popularity, particularly in the USA. (1)

Qi (Ch'i) plays an essential role in feng shui.

The traditional Chinese art of geomancy, the placement and arrangement of space called feng shui, is based on calculating the balance of Qi (Ch'i), interactions between the five elements, yin and yang and other factors. The retention or dissipation of qi is believed to affect the health, wealth, energy level, luck and many other aspects of the occupants of the space. Color, shape and the physical location of each item in a space affects the flow of qi by slowing it down, redirecting it or accelerating it, which directly affects the energy level of the occupants. Feng shui is said to be a form of qi divination. (2)

Ch'i (Qi) is the universal life force.

It rains near very flowing water and is created whenever anything is done perfectly.

To operate effectively we need to encourage as much chi'i as possible into our home.

Ch'i can be both positive and negative.

For instance, gently moving water creates positive ch'i, while stagnant water creators negative ch'i.

We want as much good ch'i as possible, but naturally want to eliminate any negative ch'i.

Ch'i needs to be nurtured and gathered.

Chi 'is made up of both YIN AND YANG.

Yin and yang are the two opposites in the universe. For instance night and day, short and tall. None of these can exist without the other.

The ancients never tried to define yin and yang, but just collect lists of opposites.

YIN is represented by black, and YANG is white.

The concept began many thousands of years ago when the ancient Chinese called the shady, northern slopes of the mountain YIN and the sunny, southern slopes YANG.

The ancient Taoists used the familiar symbol of yin and yang to represent completion.

This symbol, which looks like two tadpoles in a circle, symbolizes the universe.

One tadpole is black with a white dot in it and the other white with a black dot in it.

The dots indicate that inside every yin there is a certain amount of yang, and inside every yang is a degree of yin.

If your property is too yin, (t0o flat) you can remedy this by planting shrubs and trees or sometimes by the introduction of rocks or a garden shed. It is important to think ahead. Small trees grow into big trees, which can alter the feng shui of the immediate area.

If your area is too yang, (too hilly) you may be able to flatten part of your property to create a balance of yin and yang energy.

Even the house itself is divided into yin and yang areas.

The front of the house, which serves to greet people to the property, is outgoing and yang.

The farther inside the house you go, the more yin, and private, the rooms become This is why bedrooms usually feel better if they are located well away from the front door.

For those of you out there that are starting to get your home in balance, I hope my Feng Shui Tips will help!

References:
(1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feng_shui
(2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qi